Review: Big Little Lies, Episode Six – “Burning Love”

At the beginning of this episode I fully expected that, by the end, we would finally have an answer to our burning question: who killed whom? I falsely assumed that next week’s final episode would depict the fallout of our series-long mystery and our characters would have to pick up the pieces, yet I mistook Big Little Lies for other television shows. Had this show went the route of the often-comparable How To Get Away With Murder or even The Walking Dead but setting up a cliffhanger for its finale I wouldn’t have been surprised, yet thinking about it now I realize I likely would have been disappointed. Each and every week, even as the show has wavered between a solid A+ and a solid A-, I am amazed at how much this series is taking its time. I’ve mentioned in these reviews as well as amongst friends that Big Little Lies is the perfect excuse for a limited series and that HBO is the perfect network for it to call home. HBO affords this show immense liberty–for example, Witherspoon’s Madeline gives the greatest f-word laced tirade since Planes, Trains, and Automobiles in this episode–and this show has truly premiered at the perfect time and place. I predict this show will be endlessly re-watchable once it receives a home video release.

As of yet, things have still not come to a head for out characters, although long awaited plot developments have come to fruition, specifically regarding Madeline and Celeste. For episodes we know that Madeline/Ed and Bonnie/Nathan will have their dinner party, yet it finally happens in this episode with stellar results, excusing the show for dragging out the plot line for so long. The dinner scene is so interesting, I think, because it doesn’t really revolve around Madeline and Nathan like many expected it to–instead, the attention of the adults is drawn to Abigail, who has revealed that her super-secret senior project is to sell her virginity online, the proceeds going to Amnesty International. I can’t put my finger on it, but this shocked me. Although the whole of the show feels incredibly realistic, I at first did not think this seemed real, and it seemed too cartoonish for a show that dwelled in realism. After mulling it over the past couple of days, though, I have come to understand just how real it feels. In this time of armchair activism and faux-charity, Abigail’s disillusionment makes sense: she’s seen her mother exhibit these characteristics as well and, although deeply flawed and über-hip, Abigail thinks she’s making a difference. Of course the only reason for this story-line is to draw Madeline and Abigail close together as Madeline reveals to her daughter that she had an affair the year prior. (I also want to point out that Madeline’s vomiting reaction at the dinner table was by far the funniest and best used vomiting I’ve seen in the past decade, perhaps ever. Props to Witherspoon and Vallée for playing it so well.)

Another key turning point comes for Celeste, who seems to be finally breaking away from Perry. While all eyes point to the theatre as Madeline’s production of Avenue Q debuts, Celeste attacks Perry before the show and breaks his urethra after another attempted marital rape. We’ve come a long way since the production was almost shut down, but the musical still manages to be a key plot point and meeting point for the main characters, who are all there–even Bonnie and Nathan for some reason–except for Perry and Celeste. Perry lurks in the background of every scene he’s in like Jason Vorhees in the Friday the 13th series, and his injury feels more than justified yet terrifies us for what’s next. Just what will Perry do to Celeste in retaliation, especially if he discovers that she’s been quietly apartment hunting at the behest of her therapist?

Jane, meanwhile, manages to continue her self-doubt in a very interesting scene where she is trying to convince herself that her rapist might indeed be a good man and not someone worth shooting. This line of thought exudes Jane’s character who struggles with this all along. Although she doesn’t outwardly believe her son is an abusive bully, part of her still thinks he is due to the circumstances of his conception. Her nurturing wasn’t enough to combat the nature of his father. Even as she tries to make amends with Renata in this episode after poking her in the eye, this self-doubt is still there and the audience questions if Ziggy is a bully, too.

There is some wonderful music in this episode, especially the continued use of “Papa Was A Rollin’ Stone” by The Temptations and the titular Elvis song. There’s only one more week for me to be amazed at this show, and I anticipate next week’s finale to do just that, while still defying expectations that its genre has placed it in.

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