Review: Big Little Lies, Episode Five – “Once Bitten”

More so than ever I am amazed at how remarkably well Big Little Lies pulls off the dynamic of the American family, something it has been doing throughout the entire series, but something that it does particularly well this episode. Despite the fact that these families are lofty and obviously very wealthy, they feel incredibly whole and authentic, a large step in the right direction for “slice of life” television. While television shows such as Fargo and (more darkly) Breaking Bad have also touched on family dynamics in recent years, Big Little Lies uses the family as the entire basis on which the show is situated. The family, specifically the relationship that mothers have with members of their family, remains the focal point of the show, and the central star that the solar system of the series revolves around. These women are flawed, dark, complex, and, above all else, whole. The characters are remarkably well written and fleshed out, with most of the praise falling on the shoulders of their tremendous actors, as well as the tremendous editing of the show which I notice more and more each week.

In such a short amount of time this show has given us so much about our main characters, specifically Madeline, Celeste, and Jane, each of whom get ample screen time during the episode. The hour runtime of each episode helps the audience attach themselves to these characters, but the limited nature of the show also attributes to this–in the age of “event television” and the limited series, none more so than Big Little Lies cement themselves so firmly in their truncated series order. Each episode feels the perfect length and, although it would be quite easy to binge these episodes should they have been released all at once, releasing them once a week makes the feel more special, more justified. With only two episodes left, there isn’t much time for our characters to reach a homeostasis and each slowly advance towards the inevitable.

Nicole Kidman steals the show this week as Celeste travels to the therapist by herself unlike in last week’s episode where she and Perry went together. Triggered by yet another horrific incident of violence, which the audience is brilliant made privy to through the glorious editing, Celeste comes very close to revealing the true extent of Perry’s abuse before pulling back at the last second, hiding her bruises both physically and emotionally. Kidman is fabulous with the very tough and heartfelt dialogue written by David Kelly. I can’t even begin to understand Celeste, but I think that’s the point. It’s difficult to understand her motivations, yet they feel solely real, and Kidman solidified herself as an Emmy frontrunner for her performance this week.

Elsewhere, Jane inches closer and closer to violence by driving to meet up with the man that she and Madeline believe might be Ziggy’s father and the man who violently raped Jane. Gun in tow, Jane drives and faces him head on before scrambling out of the office with no clear indication to the audience what happened inside. Although her penchant for violence has been teased previously I still don’t yet think that Jane is ready to commit such an extreme act of violence, mainly for Ziggy’s sake. Perhaps Jane is the aggravator in the violence that this story has been framed around–indeed, one of the talking heads says “Jane Chapman? She’s crazy, too,” this week–yet something must put her into direct danger to literally pull the trigger.

We get our first real glimpse at the PTA fundraiser where murder is committed during this episode, and we get a further, very brief, shot of our lead detective played by Merrin Dungey but I remain surprised we haven’t seen more of after she’s given so much screen time in the pilot episode. Two weeks remain in Big Little Lies, so I expect our two timelines will intersect with bloody abandon very soon.

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